Impact on educational attainment – Year 11

The pupil premium spend during 2015/16 was heavily targeted towards raising Y11 achievement. A significant, positive impact resulted.

Out of 153 students in last year’s Y11 cohort, 71 students (46.4%) attracted the pupil premium.

Disadvantaged and other students made progress (Progress 8) from their starting points at a similar rate (there was no statistically significant in school gap):

  • disadvantaged Progress 8 = -0.08 (confidence interval 0.18 to -0.34)
  • other Progress 8 = 0.07 (confidence interval 0.31 to -0.18)

Disadvantaged students made progress (Progress 8) from their starting points at a rate which is in line with the progress rate of all students nationally

The Progress 8 score for disadvantaged students improved significantly over the course of last year – in September it was -2.25.

Using the ‘levels of progress’ benchmarks from last year, the picture of progress for disadvantaged students is very positive:

y11-lop

The proportion of disadvantaged students who have made, and exceeded, expected rates of progress in English has improved dramatically compared to last year. These rates of progress are now better than last year’s data for other (non disadvantaged) students nationally

The proportion of disadvantaged students who have made, and exceeded, expected rates of progress in mathematics has also improved, with dramatic improvement evident in terms of students making expected progress (49% this year, compared to 24% last year). Gaps remain, both in school, and compared to other (non disadvantaged) students nationally but these are closing fast. The proportion of disadvantaged students from the academy who made expected progress in mathematics (49%) is exactly in line with the proportion of disadvantaged students, nationally, who made expected progress last year (49%)

The overall value add metric for disadvantaged students attending the academy is 1005, compared to 1008 for other students (an insignificant in school gap). This compares very favourably to the overall value add metric for disadvantaged students (last year), which was 893.

The progress of disadvantaged pupils from different starting points matches or exceeds that of other pupils nationally.

Across all subjects, there are no statistically significant in school gaps in terms of Progress 8 residuals. In English, disadvantaged students made slightly more progress than other students.

There are a number of subjects in which disadvantaged students have made particularly strong progress, compared to all students nationally (art 0.72; v-cert business 2.12; cache 3.51; construction 0.79; drama 0.74; ECDL 2.37; hospitality 0.71; photography 1.13; textiles 1.34).

Last year, only 13% of disadvantaged students achieved 5 GCSEs at A*-C including English and mathematics. This has improved this year to be 30%. The national average last year for disadvantaged students was 36%, so the academy is catching up quickly

Impact on educational attainment – Year 10

Out of 107 students in the Y10 cohort, 46 (42.9%) attracted the pupil premium.

Disadvantaged and other students are forecast to make progress (Progress 8) from their starting points at a similar rate (there is no statistically significant in school gap):

  • disadvantaged Progress 8 = 0.24
  • other Progress 8 = 0.26

Disadvantaged students are forecast to make progress (Progress 8) from their starting points at a rate which is in line with the progress rate of all students nationally

Using the ‘levels of progress’ benchmarks from last year, the picture of forecast progress for disadvantaged students is very positive:

y10-lop

The proportion of disadvantaged students who are forecast to make, and exceed, expected rates of progress in English has improved dramatically compared to last year. The proportion of Ipswich Academy disadvantaged students who are forecast to make progress at the nationally expected rate is now in line with the proportion of other students, nationally, who make progress at that rate. The proportion of Ipswich Academy disadvantaged students who are forecast to make progress faster than the nationally expected rate is now significantly above the proportion of other students, nationally, who make progress at that same rate.

The proportion of disadvantaged students who are forecast to make, and exceed, expected rates of progress in mathematics has improved dramatically compared to last year. The proportion of Ipswich Academy disadvantaged students who are forecast to make progress at the nationally expected rate is now significantly closer to the proportion of other students, nationally, who make progress at that rate. Likewise, the proportion of Ipswich Academy disadvantaged students who are forecast to make progress faster than the nationally expected rate is now significantly closer to the proportion of other students, nationally, who make progress at that same rate.

Impact on educational attainment – Key stage 3

Care needs to be taken when drawing conclusions around key stage 3 data due to:

  • the lack of any benchmarks which might indicate that, say, the Ipswich Academy expected standard in English by end Y9 is more or less challenging than the standard expected by any other school
  • the potential lack of comparability between subjects (some examinations are likely to be have been set at a more challenging standard than others)
  • the lack of clarity over what, for example, a grade 5 within reformed qualifications will look like
  • the increased expectations for performance at end Y11, which makes comparability with previous progress benchmarks (in terms of performance at end key stage 2 considered in relation to performance at end key stage 4) extremely problematic.

Given this, a formal evaluation of the impact of pupil premium spend on outcomes within key stage 3 is not provided on the academy public web site. Further information is, however, available on request.

Last updated October 17, 2016